Cassava Flour Pizza Crust Recipe (Gluten-Free, Paleo)

Heather Dessinger

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Cassava Flour Pizza Crust, Gluten-Free

If you hadn’t already guessed from this cauliflower crust and this zucchini one, pizza is kind of a big thing in my house. Friday nights often involve a couple of pizzas, a game or funny movie, a slightly early bedtime for my kids, and a glass of wine for me.

I make our pies from whatever we have on hand – butternut squash, almond flour . . . just about anything. One of our favorite crusts, though, is this one made from cassava flour. It’s easy to make, holds together well and has the doughy texture of traditional pizza. It’s also dairy-free, which is something many of you have requested, and pairs beautifully with my no-cook homemade pizza sauce. I hope you love it!

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Cassava Flour Pizza Crust, Gluten-Free
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4.21 from 222 votes

Cassava Flour Pizza Crust Recipe (Gluten-Free, Paleo)

This recipe makes two 10 inch pizzas.
Course Dinner
Cuisine Italian
Calories 2184kcal
Author Mommypotamus

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Preheat your oven to 425°F and place two baking sheet/pizza stones inside. (If you just have one you can bake the crusts separately.)
  • Combine dry ingredients in a medium mixing bowl.
  • Add wet ingredients and mix well. Allow dough to sit for about 5 minutes to allow it to firm up a little.
  • Coat your hands in olive oil, then scoop up the dough and divide it in half. Form one half into a ball. Place it on parchment paper and press it into the form of a 10 inch crust with your hands. Do the same with the second half.
  • Slide the baking sheet/pizza stones under the parchment paper/crust and bake for 12-15 minutes, then remove and add toppings. Return to the oven and bake until the cheese is melted – I like to set my oven to broil for the last few minutes so that the mozzarella browns a bit.

Nutrition

Calories: 2184kcal | Carbohydrates: 265g | Protein: 17g | Fat: 117g | Saturated Fat: 18g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 327mg | Sodium: 4805mg | Potassium: 229mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 475IU | Vitamin C: 10mg | Calcium: 392mg | Iron: 13mg

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About HEATHER

Heather is a holistic health educator, herbalist, DIYer, Lyme and mold warrior. Since founding Mommypotamus.com in 2009, Heather has been taking complicated health research and making it easy to understand. She shares tested natural recipes and herbal remedies with millions of naturally minded mamas around the world. 

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Recipe Rating




186 thoughts on “Cassava Flour Pizza Crust Recipe (Gluten-Free, Paleo)”

          • Is the 1 cup of water supposed to be there? Without any gums this was like runny pancake batter. Is something missing?

        • 5 stars
          Fanstastic! There are a lot gluten-free pizza crust recipes but very few grain-free pizza crust recipes… That actually work & taste good. This one is awesome and I’m so thankful that I found it. I am unable to do nightshades so I make a pesto sauce and use fresh mozzarella on top and I love it! Thank you!!!

          Reply
          • Have you ever taken tomatoes from Italy? They are peel and seed free. It’s the high lectin counts in night shades that make them intolerable to most people. The lectins are in the peel and seeds of these foods. I make my own pizza sauce and bar b sauce and spaghetti sauce. I can’t eat ANY grains except white basmati rice from India and organic wild rice. They must be cooked in a pressure cooker to kill any lectins.
            Now, my ulcerative/Crohn’s disease hasn’t been GONE for 3+ years! My gastroenterologist said he wishes all his patients would eat like me.

        • 1 star
          Worst recipe! I followed everything to the letter and after sitting for 15mins it’s so runny… this will not firm up to roll into a ball. Don’t waste your time and money on this recipe

          Reply
          • I followed the to the T also, and it turned out a firm, perfect consistency. Just something to think about…there is a huge variety in cassava flours. I have made cassava tortillas with one brand and had them completely fall, and then again with another brand and have them be great. Same recipe.

            I used Otto’s for this recipe.

        • 5 stars
          I know this is like a year later 😉 so it might not do you much good, but I always use tapioca flour in place of arrowroot, and it turns out amazing every time!

          Reply
    • 5 stars
      Hi Heather, I replaced the Cassava amount with a cup of Cassava flour and a half a cup of “Almond flour.” I also only used a 1/4 cup of water. My dough looks divine! I will up date once I bake. Your site is very helpful and I look forward to checking out your other recipes. Thank you.

      Reply
    • Thanks for your question, Beth! You slide the crust and parchment paper onto the baking sheet. I see now that isn’t clear – will update the instructions now.

      Reply
      • This was pure liquid. Do you add the oil to the flour mixture? I did and had to add about 1 cup more of the flour.

        Reply
          • When I made it, I did let it sit for over 5 minutes and I would say it was the texture of thick pancake batter. Not complete liquid, but definitely too liquid to form into a ball! Is it really a full cup of water and 1/2 c oil, but only 2 1/2 cups total of the different flours?

      • I just made a half batch with EnerG egg replacer and it wasn’t very good. I also used tapioca flour because that’s what I had.
        This is my first try at cassava pizza crust. The outside was crispy, but the inside was a dark yellow color, raw-like and spongy. I cooked the crust for well over the suggested time and got nowhere close to a brown crust. I get a similar spongy middle result when I make cassava tortillas. Maybe this is how it’s supposed to turn out?

        Reply
        • 4 stars
          I made a cassava crust 2nite using the “everything dough” and my NuWave.
          I used a lower heat, cooked the bottom first (5 minutes), then flipped it and cooked it 5 more minutes. It wasn’t done but I had to add the toppings. I also used the 2″ rack, the extender ring and the 80% power setting . I cooked it for 10 minutes (should have done 13 minutes) then added the cheese for 5 more minutes. It was supremely close to perfect (although the dough didn’t quite taste like traditional crust… it was cooked, firm and pretty darned good). Well worth the try if u r up to it. I even made a mini- monkey bread last night and it was out of this world (I had a 4 inch spring form pan and had to adjust the power level and cook time but I WILL be making THAT again. Personal pan Monkey Bread… mmm mmm mmm.

          Reply
        • 1 star
          This recipe doesn’t work. We wasted an entire bag of expensive cassava flour. I’m not sure how other people are making the dough bc it’s liquid after adding the water and still doesn’t set to make it a ball of dough.

          Reply
          • Dear Sam,
            I have the same problem. I live in Hamburg, Germany and am buying my cassava flour via Amazon.de (not a known brand like Otto’s etc.). It might be the quality of cassava flour (e.g. too finely milled, not finely milled enough) that may be our collective problem. I have not tried to reduce the liquid to flour ratio yet, but I have instead added a bit more cassava and arrowroot flours to give it a bit more handling…so from liquid to mushy…and by oiling my fingers, I spread out blobs of mush (I prefer to make mini pizzas) which turn out delicious and great texture every time. Maybe someone here can help us find the exact ratio? If I play around more, I will definitely update on here! Right now I just add more flours to get a ‘mushy’ consistency that is relatively workable with oiled fingertips.

    • Hi! I just made this with an egg replacement. I only made half the recipe, so double this if you are making the whole recipe. Instead of 1/4 cup applesauce (for one egg), I used 1 tsp of baking soda mixed in with the dry ingredients and 3 Tbsp of ACV (apple cider vinegar), mixed in with the wet ingredients. Worked wonderfully!

      Reply
        • 4 stars
          When you freeze crust, how do you prepare it? Is it completely frozen then you add ingredients and bake or do you thaw crust first then bake??

          I made your crust with only tapioca starch and some psyllium husk and came out thin and chewy which was delicious. Did have to bake longer then suggested. And knowing how tapioca starch works, it became slightly think but not much. I poured the batter onto pan and it made its own shape.

          Reply
          • The psyllium husk replaced egg, I’m guessing, and the tapioca replaced the arrowroot and also the cassava flour? Did you use the other ingredients? I want to try it like you did and I’d love some more details. Thanks!

  1. 5 stars
    I cut the recipe in half & made one crust. I did have to bake it a little longer, but thought it was the best Paleo tasting pizza crust I’ve ever made. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hello
      Just a casual reader of forum questions. I have a taste aversion to anything with arrowroot. Tiger nut Flour works very well with this recipe instead of the arrowroot. Good luck with your next batch!

      Reply
      • 2 stars
        Unfortunately, this recipe didn’t work for me. As soon as the water hit the Cassava Flour it turned into a brick. I had to add an additional 3-4 cups more of water. Plus, it took twice as long to cook. It didn’t taste bad, but never cooked through and was very chewy.

        Reply
        • Hi Donna, what brand of cassava flour did you use? The dough should have been runny just after mixing and needed a little time to firm up. The reaction you’re describing sounds more like tapioca starch, which is derived from cassava.

          Reply
          • Hi Heather, it is organic cassava flour by Tres Pontas, with ingredients 100% organic ground cassava flour. What brand do you recommend? I would love to figure out what happened because it’s a great alternative to cauliflower pizza. Thanks!

        • 4 stars
          I think the brand of cassava flour makes a huge difference. I’ve found this in other recipes as well.

          I use Ecoideas Organic Cassava flour and it always needs waaaay more liquid than any recipe on any webpage asks for!! When I did the recipe as directed, I got a pile of crumble. But I just kept adding water until it was workable.

          Perhaps it would be of service to people to identify the brands you use in the recipes?

          Reply
        • Room Temperature IS EVERYTHING with Baking using ANY Gluten/Grain Free Flours You must check your temp to make sure the kitchen area is Not above 74 degrees or it can definitely be an issue with This Otto’s Cassava flour. I swear I’ve had to wait until Mine was cooled down to bake in it for calzones and Pop Tarts as well.

          Reply
  2. I must have done something wrong but I can’t figure out what! I’ve looked at the ingredient list many times and can’t figure it out 🙁 I’ve had to add an extra cup (1/2 of each flour) and it’s getting thicker but it still not to the point where I could form it into a ball :'( I’m gonna add more til I can and I’ll let you know if it turned out! The bowl I used to mix the dough has a tiny bit of coconut oil in it as I just used it to toss the popped popcorn in (I air pop it then mix in coconut oil and salt). Could that tiny bit of coconut cause my problem?

    Reply
    • I’ve made this crust recipe 20+ times now and ever since the first time, I start with only 1/2 cup of water and gradually add in more as needed. Usually I end up using 2/3-3/4 cup.

      Reply
  3. I made this today using sorghum flour instead of arrowroot flour because that’s what I happen to have on hand and they are both lectin free and gluten free. The consistency was excellent it was really easy to form it into a ball and to roll it out. I pre-cooked it for a little bit longer and it was a little dry but for a gluten and lectin free crust it was actually really good and I will definitely make this again. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  4. 4 stars
    The crust was delicious. I added a tad of rosemary to channel in some foccacia love. The only thing that was disappointing was the center of the dough. I made two 10″ crusts and followed the recipe but the center (cross section) of the dough was undercooked. As soon as i cut a slice, i saw a beautiful top layer, a translucent gummy center, and a beautifully crisp bottom. Where did I go wrong?

    Reply
    • Ovens can vary significantly in temperature even when set to the same number – my guess is just that our ovens are calibrated slightly differently and you’ll need to cook yours a bit longer 🙂

      Reply
    • Several weeks ago I heard some chefs on TV talking about making pizza – they all agreed that an oven needs to warm up for one hour before baking a pizza – just a thought.

      Reply
      • OMG! Bless you so much for a pizza crust recipe that does not contain coconut flour as coconut flour is like pouring nails into my digestive system! Even after 5 years of having done GAPS and additional years being low FODMAP (I will be omitting the garlic and onion powders). I am making this tomorrow or the next day as we are on spring break and looking for something different and more fun to eat. We still can’t do dairy (turns out we have genetic issues with it) and are just going to have a no-cheese pizza. Can’t wait. Thanks!

        Reply
        • 5 stars
          SUCCESS! We actually did make this recipe twice in the last 2 weeks. I left the dried garlic and onion out of the crust and used your sauce recipe, also cutting the garlic down to just 1 clove (as I have found I can tolerate a small amount of high FODMAP foods). We also have to leave off the cheese. My other change was making 4 individual sized pizzas (same amount of baking time you suggest) rather than 2 larger ones, and just bake them all together on a large baking sheet. Works great, and it’s fun having individual pizzas, especially since I add hot peppers to mine 🙂 Turned out fantastic! I made the pizzas on a Thursday night the first week and a Friday night the next. By Monday of this week my 12 year old was asking me if I would make pizza again this week. It is soooo good! I just wish Cassava flour was not so expensive! Since there are just 2 of us eating these, we have another set for a meal a different day.
          The pizzas also reheat well. One of these days when I’m feeling ambitious, I may make enough for a 2nd batch and try freezing the pizzas.

          Reply
          • If you happen to have corn allergies like me look for the bags with white sell by lables. That means those are processed in corn free factories.

          • I have made this a few times now and it’s still great! This week my husband and daughter were out of town. So I had the kitchen free to whip up a few batches, cook, cool, and freeze. From each batch, I make 4 personal sized pizzas and put them in the oven on a baking sheet, with parchment paper underneath. After they cool, I stack them with parchment paper between (I just re-used the parchment paper I had cooked them on), that way they don’t get all stuck together in a lump. Then I wrap each one individually and write the date I made them. We now have 16 personal sized pizzas in the freezer. The first time I attempted to make a double batch, I used one big mixing bowl. That was a mistake. The dough is sticky and can be a bit frustrating to work with, so it took me forever to get 8 small pizzas that were approximately the same size. Learning from this, when I attempted it again this week, I made a double batch using 2 medium sized mixing bowls. That worked out much better as it was easier to divide each mixing bowl into 4 approximately equal pizzas. I then ran out of flour and repeated the process later in the week, after I picked up some more flour.

          • Hope you see this! Try going to an international market to purchase cassava flour. We found the brand “Mountain Delight” yucarina. A 12 oz box was $3. I have only used it in one recipe so far and it seemed to work as well as the $17.99 brand. Good luck!

        • I know this an old post/comment, but Mai I recommend Daiya mozzarella “cheese” shredded? it’s dairy free, and it worked beautifully!

          Reply
          • Any ideas for a replacement for parchment paper? Could I do this on an oiled cookie sheet? I live in Costa Rica, where cassava and cassava flour are abundant, but parchment paper is a rarity I’ve never been able to find.

            Also, what about liquid coconut oil or olive oil as a replacement for avocado oil? Thoughts? I’m excited to try this for my gluten-free, dairy-free, sensitive-to-brassica vegetable boys.

          • 1 star
            Horrible recipe. Made it exactly how the recipe said. Came out like running pancake batter. I let it rest 10 minutes. Then added another cup of cassava flour. Then it was like hummus. I’m guessing too much water and oil. As I was adding all the liquids I was questioning it. But not having a lot of experience with arrowroot powder I thought maybe it was needed. Nope.

        • this comment has nothing to do with baking but just to respond to Nancy, read the Medical Medium Books by Anthony Williams, you will understand why you can’t eat dairy or other foods that kill you. Basically you are feeding the pathogens that are nesting in your liver. You will have an Awh Ha moment after reading these books. That being said after reading these comments I am afraid of this pizza not turning out right and having to throw expensive cassava flour out the window.

          Reply
  5. 5 stars
    I thought I needed active dry yeast for pizza crust…………. I want to make this but not sure if I should use dry yeast what should I do thanks you for this recipe I love pizza

    Reply
    • 5 stars
      We made this last night in a double batch using otto’s cassava flour and it blew our minds! So tasty and amazing texture! For my pizza we used a cauliflower sauce that just had cauliflower, oil, salt, and a garlic clove. The combination with the toppings was amazing! Also, for anyone else dealing with histamine issues otto’s brand is apparently one of the only cassava flours that is not fermented so definitely try that brand if you have reacted to cassava flour in the past!

      Reply
  6. Do you poke holes in your dough before placing it in the oven? And how do you keep your pizza crust from looking pale?

    Reply
    • I don’t poke holes, although you totally can. The dough does develop a few small air pockets but they’re no big deal. As for color, this crust is on the pale side but it doesn’t bother my family.

      Reply
  7. I followed the recipe to a T. It was pretty gooey dough, but I spread it out and it’s in the oven now. No way I could form a ball. I hope it turns out. Looks really good.

    Reply
  8. 5 stars
    “I like be this pizza!” From, Jack
    We just made this for the first time and it is delicious! It’s simpler and faster than the paleo pizza crust we usually make plus it tastes better! It also holds firmer, like a wheat crust, and we didn’t have a gummy center.
    I did substitute broth for water because I put broth in everything I can 🙂 but that’s not something that really changes the result.

    Reply
    • I’m so glad Jack liked it! Wish you guys were closer so I could get his feedback on recipes as I work on them. He’s definitely one of my favorite food critics. 🙂

      Oh, and now I have to try using broth. Such a great idea, Zeffie!

      Reply
  9. I just made this but used gelatin eggs and I added 1t of cream of tartar and 1/2 t of bakin soda. I tried a bite of the crust and it’s delicious and easy to make!

    Reply
  10. 4 stars
    I made this tonight. I made it AIP friendly. Instead of the eggs, I used 1/2 cup applesauce (1/4 cup for each egg). And only used 1/2 cup of water. Came together very nicely. Was a very easy dough to work with, and roll out. I baked each pie for 20 mins prior to adding toppings, then baked again for about 8 mins. Very tasty and very close texture to traditional pizza crust! Will make again! Thanks!

    Reply
    • So excited to hear that applesauce worked! I can’t have eggs or beef, so most gelatins are out for me. Thanks for sharing your experience!

      Reply
  11. 5 stars
    Thank you for this super easy, fast, and delicious GF pizza crust! Mine was a little undercooked but that’s my fault. It was still really good and even my picky daughter loves it. I am so making this again. I don’t order the GF pizza in restaurants because it’s not very good so it was nice to sit down and have something that I haven’t had in awhile.

    Reply
  12. 5 stars
    I made this with duck eggs and leaf lard from our pastures pigs (we topped it with cracklings – from making the lard – and goat cheese) Best gluten free pizza crust we’ve had, it’s also very filling. Our 5 & 7 year old boys loved it!

    Reply
  13. Seriously the best gluten free crust I’ve had! I made it with applesauce instead of eggs like someone mentioned to make it AIP. Will definitely make this crust again. Thank you!

    Reply
  14. I just made this. It was a little underdone in the middle but didn’t affect the flavor or crispness. It is definitely a great easy fast pizza crust.

    I used tapioca flour instead of arrowroot. and forgot the salt. Oops. Hubby liked it.

    If hubby approves its a definite do over.
    Thank you

    Reply
  15. 5 stars
    Oh my goodness~ best paleo pizza crust ever!!! I’ve made them out of cauliflower (turn out squishy and gross), and almond flour, coconut flour- nothing is as good as this recipe you shared. The key is the cassava- which is what we make our homemade tortillas out of~ once again, cassava saves the day!!!!! Perfect texture crust- awesome!!

    Reply
    • Dear Amy,
      I also am in love with this pizza dough recipe – it was my first ever paleo pizza dough attempt and is a huge success, thank you very much Mommypotamus!
      I was wondering what tortilla recipe you use as I have tried only once recipe out so far and it was horrible haha, could you direct me?
      Thanks again Mommypotamus for bringing back my pizza dreams! I haven’t had any pizza in 3 years after going AIP/modified paleo. I use a coconut-based cheese I find here in Germany and organic tomato paste, although I will experiment with a beet-based pizza sauce sometime!

      Reply
  16. I hate thin crust pizzas! I miss my deep dish but can’t find any gluten free versions. I tried making this recipe tonight and instead of making 2 10 inch I tried making one thicker 12 inch. They crust turned out gummy as hell! We were hungry though and it tasted decent just really gummy so we ate it anyway.

    Reply
  17. Great recipe! Easy, delicious, healthy and family approved! First time working with cassava and arrowroot. Substituted egg for 2 flax eggs which possibly made the inside of crust gummy. Will try with apple sauce next! Definitely a keeper. Thank you

    Reply
  18. 4 stars
    I made this pizza crust for the first time tonight. I had trouble with the dough coming together into a ball so I just spread it out as best as I could. Next time I’ll put less of the water in and add it in as needed. I wasn’t fond of the garlic and onion seasoning so I’ll omit that next time. Overall it was good and totally worked with my lectin free diet and was satisfying as well!!!

    Reply
  19. Made this tonight following exact recipe for the most part, but I baked my pizza crust for an additional 6 minutes, and it turned out perfect. I added more seasonings to the dough as well.

    Reply
  20. 5 stars
    I made this tonight for dinner and it was
    delicious. I halved the recipe and after reading some of the reviews saying the middle wasn’t cooked I made two personal sized pizzas and rolled the dough thinner. It was perfect. I cooked one half for my pizza and I cooked the other one without toppings and will freeze for a later date. This made my day finding and enjoying a simple recipe for paleo pizza dough. Thank you. I’ll def make again

    Reply
  21. Wowsa! Pizza is yummy! I used a big oven toaster oven to bake most dishes/desserts. I warmed up the oven for 30-40 minutes. I also substituted the eggs for the baking soda & apple cider vinegar (per several posts from others on here). Pizza came out so yummy. Btw, I did use all 1 cup of water in the recipe. I slowly added a little at a time per other posts saying they didn’t need the full 1-cup so I added a little at a time but I did use 1-cup. I also added real garlic to the dough. I didn’t have onion powder but I did put raw diced onions on pizza. It was really good, thank you for coming up with this recipe. I have tried 4 different Paleo/gluten free pizza recipes and this one is the best yet!

    Reply
  22. This crust is wonderful!! I’m AIP and have been hunting for a compliant pizza crust! My hubris over!! Now if I could find a nomato pizza sauce that tastes good with decent consistency! Thanks!!

    Reply
  23. I was never able to get the dough to form a ball, even after adding more cassava & arrowroot flours. It smells amazing though. Any suggestions for next time?

    Reply
  24. 4 stars
    I thought this was a pretty good base. I ended up using 1cup cassava flour and 1/2 cup sourghum flour because I know how difficult cassava flour can be and subbed potato starch for arrowroot. I also added 2.5 tsp of guar gum because I don’t trust any gluten free recipe that doesn’t call for it. I added 1tsp oregano and 1tbs parmesan to the dough, refrigerated it overnight and tadaow. Everyone loved it.

    Reply
  25. 2 stars
    I’ve made this pizza 3 times now. It comes out rubbery. I’ve tried it with the egg version & the sub with baking soda/3 tbsp ACV. I wish I could figure out why the dough is rubbery. I followed the recipe to a T. The dough spreads out beautifully on the baking sheet. I’m going to try & incorporate other grain free Flour’s to see if I can get a better pizza. A few others posted the same issue: pizza came out rubbery.

    Reply
  26. 5 stars
    Wowie Zowie! As good or better than regular pizza crust. Omitted the garlic and onion powder. Didn’t have parchment on hand so I greased my cast iron skillet with olive oil well. Patted the dough out right in the pan. The dough didn’t stick at all. Followed recipe as written other than those few things. Turned out A-Mazing! Thank you!

    Reply
  27. 5 stars
    Thank you for this recipe. I went without pizza for so long, but now I get to enjoy pizza night with the hubby again. Only thing I changed is subbed applesauce for the eggs. Delicious, and I love the chewy texture. Grateful to you!

    Reply
  28. Hi there. I thought that pizza was delicious but then at the end of the day so to speak I noticed that the inside was not even cooked. I cooked it for 15 minutes before adding the items. I also brought it to broil just before and the insides were still raw. I didn’t notice it at first and it tasted fantastic but I can’t eat it again. Any suggestions

    Reply
  29. 5 stars
    I hate when people rate recipes and don’t follow them exactly, but I’m about to do just that. I’m doing this because there seemed to be comments about what to use instead of arrowroot flour. I cut the recipe in half and used almond flour instead of arrowroot flour and only used 1/4 cup of water. Those were the only changes I made. The crust was perfect (for me). It was thin and crispy and, well, delicious. I gave it a 5-star rating, but that’s with my changes. I’m sure the way it was written is equally as delicious. Thank you for all of your great posts, Mommypotamus!

    Reply
  30. For a paleo crust this was the best I’ve tried. Very easy. I did wait 5 minutes, and it was a batter consistency, so I just poured it on the parchment and spread it out. It cooked up nicely and made a very nice, crisp, flatbread kind of crust. Will definitely make again.

    Reply
  31. Pizza is my favorite thing to cook with the kids. It is one food that their “help” can actually be help. You can’t really screw up putting toppings on, and they love to customize their own little pizzas.

    Reply
  32. 2 stars
    I hate to write a not so positive review, but I made this recipe and it ended up as a really runny texture like pancake batter and I had to add more flour and arrowroot.. It took me an hour to get it back to a normal consistency (popping it back into the fridge for five
    Min to hopefully set up more) and I followed the recipe directions. It does have a great taste with cassava flour but I won’t be using this recipe again

    Reply
    • I’m sorry to hear that! Since this recipe has worked for so many others I’m wondering if there’s a reason we can pinpoint. Do you happen to be using metric measurements rather than imperial? Would you mind sharing what brand of cassava flour you used?

      Reply
  33. We tried this recipe. We topped with garlic alfredo sauce, applewood uncured bacon, king salmon and pineapple and it is a winner.

    Reply
  34. 3 stars
    I’m pretty sure I followed this recipe as written, but the consistency was runny like pancake batter. I added some almond flour, but it was still runny. I just poured it onto the parchment paper and spread it out a little. It didn’t come out at all bad tasting. I enjoyed it, but I think I’ll try a different recipe next time.

    Reply
  35. 4 stars
    I tried this with chickpea/garbanzo flour instead of the arrowroot (I didn’t have). It was very forgiving and.. The consistency was great and I could roll it out after letting it sit for the 5 minutes. Personally, next time I’ll try it with some baking powder for a bit more lift, but my partner loved it!

    Reply
  36. Finally an excellent gluten free pizza crust! I’ve gone through countless recipes and premade crusts, but my search is over. Thank you!

    Reply
  37. I noticed that the nutritional facts all read zero. I know this isn’t accurate but wondering if you might have them on hand and wouldn’t mind sharing them. Since my husband was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a week ago, I’ve been diving deep into every recipe to find those that are similar to all of the things he loves and grew up on. I want him to feel like he is cheating on his new found lifestyle without actually cheating. I’m hoping the stats are favorable. Thank you so much for your time.

    Reply
    • 3 stars
      Cassava and arrowroot are both high carb. Good for gluten free, not so good if your counting carbs, but still better than wheat

      Reply
  38. 5 stars
    This made three delicious pizzas! The only change I made was to replace the eggs with gelatin eggs (I am currently on AIP and can’t have eggs). With the first crust, I made a pizza and ate it right away, and then I split the remaining dough into two personal pizza shells, baked them, then froze. I was so happy to have these in my freezer just in case. I let them thaw a little, then toasted in the toaster oven until warm and crispy before topping. With most cassava flour things I’ve made, I almost feel like they were better (crispier and less gummy) after reheating.
    Thank you SO much for this recipe so I could have (dairy and tomato free) pizza without sabotaging my work so far!

    Reply
  39. 4 stars
    This was a good crust. I had to add a lot more flour (I had not read the reviews first) to make it ball-worthy. I made it pretty thin in the middle (some places a little too thin and it got crackerish), but I think this prevented it from being undercooked. It was a nice durable crust that held my toppings very nicely. By the way, we did something we’ve never done before and made a sloppy joe pizza. Sloppy joe and cheese on the crust – it was great! Also, rolled out really thin, this dough (thick not runny) makes great crackers.

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  40. 4 stars
    Mine turned out super runny making it hard to form the dough and form the crust. It turned out fine once I baked it and was super tasty. After reading the comments I would adjust the recipe to only use 1/2 to 3/4 cups water to see if that helps!

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  41. 5 stars
    This worked perfectly, thank you! AIP compliant (eggs have been introduced) with no Xanthan gum addition, I’d been searching for a good recipe ages. I did cook for a little longer than suggested so there was no soggy on the base at all. Big thumbs up!

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  42. 5 stars
    This recipe was wonderful. My wife even loved it! I used less water as I reached the right texture before adding it all in. I also baked it (before adding toppings) for probably 25 min at 200C (we are in Germany) and it was perfectly done. Thank you so much!

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  43. Best gluten-free pizza dough I’ve found! I’ve tried several recipes in attempts to have pizza lunch for my preschooler, and this has been the best on a number of levels. I did make some adjustments.

    – I first subbed coconut flour for arrowroot because I thought we didn’t have any. Following the same ratios, the recipe turned out great. The texture was different, and it has a nice toasty bottom, and prettier color.
    – Then, I found the arrowroot and made another batch. The arrowroot dough was more liquidy, and I had to add 1/4 cup more of arrowroot than original recipe called for.
    – I also made mini pizzas, which made it easier to manage than the 10″ pizzas recommended in the recipe.

    Hubby prefers the coconut version, but I think the arrowroot version tastes more like true pizza dough. The 4-year-old loved them both and ate 2 personal pizzas, then asked if we could have it for lunch every day!

    Thank you for this easy, quick recipe that the whole family can enjoy!

    Reply
  44. I just made this, double checked my ingredients and their amounts and I had pancake batter. There was NO WAY I could pick it up, divide it, etc. I ended up adding about another 1/2 C Casava flour. Hope this works!

    Reply
      • 3 stars
        I DID let it rest the 5 minutes, it was an awful consistency. Then, when I added more flour it was pretty good. When I cooked it, I found the inside didn’t cook, that’s why it was soft. The outside was great! Needs a bit of tweaking, should make about four 8” pizzas, not two.

        Reply
        • I had the same issue. I think there must be a typo in this because there is no way that gets thicker. I didn’t add more flour though and just poured it like a pancake – it worked pretty well. Good taste 🙂

          Reply
  45. 1 star
    I was very hopeful for this recipe but it was a big fail. I followed the recipe exactly and although the consistency as more like batter, my regular go-to gf pizza crust is also like batter so that didn’t concern me. Before I added the toppings, the crust puffed up great and looked like it was going to be soft delicious. Then I added toppings and the crust got really thin and turned into a thin layer of gummy dough. It also tasted very eggy. I’m wondering if the quality of the flours I used was off? Not sure if that’s a possible reason it didn’t work out. In any case, glad to hear this recipe has worked for most people!

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  46. 1 star
    This was horrible. It turned out like liquid and I added another cup of flour with no success. Really disappointed and unimpressed with this recipe

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  47. 5 stars
    Fantastic recipe! We have made it twice already, a big one and then smaller ones. Mr 6 year old asked for it again! I like that it has just a few ingredients, I already had everything I needed here and now I have a go to recipe when we want pizza. Thanks!

    Reply
  48. Im very confused it looks like some people can make this and it is a crust and other people make it and it is batter. Can you offer any guidance>

    Reply
    • I second this request! I actually have made this several times and it has been a batter – still good though! But this week I made it again and it was the texture of a dough… I did nothing I know of differently except that I used eggs from our backyard chickens… perhaps they are smaller… anyway… I have no idea why that happened!

      Reply
      • Need a little help,

        I have tapioca flour and arrowroot flour.
        I was going to just substitute the tapioca four for the cassava flour. Would that not work?

        Reply
        • Obviously this is too late for you but in case anyone else is wondering the same thing, no, you can’t sub tapioca for cassava flour I’m afraid, as tapioca flour is typically just made from the starch from the root, whereas cassava flour is the whole root ground up, so they have different properties in baking. Very occasionally when buying from international brands some cassava flour is labelled as tapioca flour, but this is unusual and the vast majority of what you will find labelled “tapioca flour” will be the starch.

          Tapioca starch *can* usually be subbed for arrowroot in most recipes, though, they do have slightly different properties but are close enough that they’re interchangeable for most things.

          Reply
  49. I tried this recipe and the ingredients remained liquid and did not form a pizza dough. Is one of the ingredients in error? I used 1 and 1/2 cups cassava flour, 1 cup arrowroot, 2 tsp sea salt, 1 tsp onion powder, 1 tsp garlic powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup olive oil & 1 cup of water.

    Reply
  50. 3 stars
    This did not work for me at all. I followed the exact directions and measured my ingredients. I’m not sure why it didn’t turn out. It was completely sticky, even with using oil on my hands. Stuck to the parchment paper and couldn’t be used at all.
    I would love to know what I messed up on so I could fix it in the future!

    Reply
  51. 2 stars
    Sorry, this did not work for me. I did sub gelatin egg for the eggs as I have an allergy- maybe that was the issue? It rolled out great, smelled amazing while baking and had a great taste, but after putting on the sauce the crust became gummy. Maybe if I had not topped the crust it would have been alright but I am not sure.

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  52. 3 stars
    I followed this recipe just as you wrote it. When it was time to form in a ball it was more like a thick cake batter and not possible to form into a ball. Nonetheless I scraped the batter onto parchment paper and set to forming it into a circle with oiled hands and slapped it in the oven.
    Where it did take a little shape and rose to the occasion, well at least I thought. Added some sauce and cheese put it back in waited, took it out, cut it and though I would give the taste five stars the dough was a fail, it was like chewing a gummy bear. Sorry as much as I really wanted this to work out it did not, wish I knew what it was to fix it because it does have great flavor.

    Reply
  53. Cassava flour made me really sick so I will not be using it ever again then I read up on cassava flour and if it is not processed right it can because of the cyanide in it which has to be properly handled to get rid of it. I did use and organic one that has a good reputation but it did not agree at all. my gut two days later is still in pain. with a massive headache. I am trying out the low histamine diet as I have IBS and such so I have gut issues most of my life, Which makes it hard to eat anything.

    Reply
  54. I tried the cassava pizza crust and mine turned out like rubber. It did not look anything like yours, and I followed the recipe except I had to add a smidge of tapioca starch to complete the 1 full cup. I even added more cassava flour but to no avail. I baked it first for 10 min. As well. ?

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  55. 5 stars
    Pizza is delicious! I used 1/2 cup coconut flour since I didn’t have any arrowroot flour. I also left out the sea salt. I used cabot cheese (white one) for my cheese since i cannot have dairy and for the sauce I used Rao’s homemade marinara sauce. Thank you for this recipe as I am on the Candida diet lifestyle and so I had to give up alot of favorite foods, drinks & sugars/sweets. But my God has shown me that I can still enjoy sweetner, sweets and foods that won’t feed the Candida.

    Reply
  56. 5 stars
    This is my go to pizza crust recipe. Thank you for sharing with all of us! I live in an arid climate and at higher altitude, so the only changes I would suggest for those above 5,000’ include: 1- Additional moisture is needed. I have tried more water, but actually have found more oil is the ticket- typically 1-3 Tbps. 2- I cook 10 min with the sauce only. Then I cook additional 15 for the the rest of the pizza with complete toppings. My hubs asks for this over regular pizza dough now. Delightful!!! Thank you again.

    Reply
  57. 1 star
    You have way too much liquid in this recipe. When I got everything together and let stand 5 min, it was most definitely resembling pancake batter😤😤😤

    Reply
  58. I cook my crust with the toppings already on it. What are your thoughts on that alternative?

    I am using cassava flour for the first time and find it does hold together as well as regular white flour. Any idea what I could do to improve that?

    Reply
  59. 4 stars
    I made mine with egg replacer… turned out good anyhow. Topped with vegan cheese and pepperoncinis and fody sauce.

    Reply
  60. 5 stars
    I really like this recipe but I could never quite get it thin enough for my family. Tonight I reduced the water to 3/4 cup and used my tortilla press to make thin personal sized crusts. So good!

    Reply
  61. 5 stars
    Reading the comments, I realized I needed to add water SLOWLY. I ended up only needing 3/4 cup of water, but this can vary depending on your ingredient choices. I stuck with the set recipe and added less water. It turned out AMAZING! Tasted like real italian pizza, pressed on the thinner side, and cooked crispy. Dipping the crust in olive oil was also fantastic.

    Reply
  62. I tried this recipe as it looked really good tasty option. However the dough just doesn’t stick together to form a manageable crust??

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  63. 4 stars
    Thank you for your recipe. It tastes good and has a nice texture.

    I was wondering if I did it right because mine looks a little transparent in the middle although the outside looks baked. Is it normal?

    Instead of eggs I used flax eggs so not sure if that’s why.

    Unfortunately, I burned my thumb taking it out of the oven so I dropped it on the floor. I may be making it again so wanted to check about the transparent center I had. (Reminds me of biting into an orange slice or spice drop candy since I can see my teeth marks).

    Reply