5 Best Glass Teapots for Herbalists & Tea Lovers

Heather Dessinger

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Collection of glass teapots on kitchen counter

Anytime I post about the benefits of elderberry or lemon balm tea along with a photo of something I’m sipping on that day, I’ll get a ton of comments like “Love that herb so much but seriously TELL ME ABOUT THAT TEAPOT.” 

Several years ago, I was given a glass teapot that made brewing my daily herbal teas something I truly look forward to. My first one was too fragile to actually boil water in, so it’s just for steeping and serving, but over the years I’ve collected a few additional ones that can hold larger amounts and/or can be used on the stovetop.

I love how beautifully clear glass teapots display my therapeutic teas, and I find that I make and drink more of them because of how enjoyable the teapots are to use.

Since I’m always getting questions about what I use, I decided to order and test a few more so that I could share my favorites. Here are my top five. 

best glass teapots

Wilmax Thermo Glass Tea Pot With Removable Stainless Steel Spout Filter

Stovetop Safe: Yes

Best For: Loose leaf tea, Blooming Tea, Fresh Herbs & Citrus Peels

Sizes Available: 32 ounce (pictured) and 54 ounce 

Where To Buy:  Find them here

The Wilmax Thermo Glass Tea Pot is gorgeous and stovetop safe, but because it has a coiled spring infuser (versus a fine mesh one) it doesn’t completely filter out cut and sifted herbs.

It does work well for blooming teas, loose leaf teas that plump up when steeped, and fresh herbs and/or citrus. 

Wilmax England makes all of its thermo glass from super clean, lead-free borosilicate, which is a type of heat resistant glass. One important thing to know about all stovetop safe glass teapots, though, is that they’re intended to be used over MEDIUM heat, not HIGH heat. 

Water takes a little longer to begin to boil but not much. Also, they recommend removing the spring infuser and lid when heating water on the stovetop. 

I’ve brewed burdock root and dandelion root tea on the stovetop in this pot, and the spring infuser filters out the roots well. I’ve even used it to simmer dried reishi for a couple of hours to make dual extraction reishi tincture.

best glass teapots

CnGlass Teapot With Removable Stainless Steel Spout Filter

Stovetop Safe: Yes

Best For: Loose leaf tea, Blooming Tea, Fresh Herbs & Citrus Peels

4 Sizes Available: 20 ounce, 30 ounce, 40 ounce, and 50 ounce (pictured) 

Where To Buy: Find them all here

This teapot is very similar in design to the Wilmax England listed above but at a lower price point, so I ordered it to compare the two. I got the larger version of this one (50 ounces) and they feel basically identical in construction. 

Like the Wilmax above, it has a spring infuser that doesn’t completely filter out cut and sifted herbs. It does work well for blooming teas, loose leaf teas that plump up when steeped, and fresh herbs and/or citrus, though. 

I’ve also used it as a serving vessel for yellow dock and other root teas and it works well for filtering the roots out. Juniper berries and herbs of similar size would likely be easily filtered out as well.

I’ve only had the Wilmax above and this CnGlass teapot for a few months so time will tell if there’s a difference in durability between the more expensive and more affordable versions, but so far they both perform exactly the same. 

best glass teapots

Wilmax Thermo Glass Tea Pot For Herbal Tea

Stovetop Safe: Yes

Best For: Cut and sifted dried herbs, Loose leaf tea

Sizes Available: 20 ounce and 29 ounce (pictured)

Where To Buy: Find them here

This Wilmax teapot is designed with a fine mesh infuser that will work perfectly with cut and sifted herbal tea and loose leaf tea. The filter is not removable (it’s attached to the lid) so won’t work well for blooming tea, but it can hold a pretty significant amount of dried herbs for strongly brewed tea. 

Although it’s made with the same heat resistant borosilicate glass that Wilmax England uses in the model above and is considered stovetop safe, the glass seems thinner and more delicate. I don’t use mine on the stovetop.

Also, in case you’re wondering, the vibrant tea in the photo was made with butterfly pea flowers and a squeeze of lemon (which causes it to change color).

lemon balm benefits tea recipe

VIVA Bjorn Glass Teapot With Removable Strainer Filter

Stovetop Safe: No

Best For: Cut and sifted dried herbs, Loose leaf tea, Blooming Tea

Sizes Available: 22 ounce (pictured) and 40 ounce

Where To Buy: Find them here. I’ll update when more are available!

This was one of my very first glass teapots and it’s still in great shape many years later. It includes a fine mesh filter that makes it perfect for cut and sifted dried herbs or loose leaf tea. 

And since the filter is removable, it can also be used for blooming tea. 

best glass teapots

Cozyna Glass Teapot with Fine Mesh Infuser

Stovetop Safe: No

Best For: Cut and sifted dried herbs, Loose leaf tea, Blooming Tea

Sizes Available: 22 ounce (pictured) and 40 ounce

Where To Buy: Find it here

This was the very first teapot I owned and I still use it often. The basket that holds herbs is roomier than the one in my VIVA Bjorn (which is also 22 ounces), so I reach for it when I want a stronger infusion.

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About HEATHER

Heather is a holistic health educator, herbalist, DIYer, Lyme and mold warrior. Since founding Mommypotamus.com in 2009, Heather has been taking complicated health research and making it easy to understand. She shares tested natural recipes and herbal remedies with millions of naturally minded mamas around the world. 

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12 thoughts on “5 Best Glass Teapots for Herbalists & Tea Lovers”

  1. Are any of the teapots you recommend made somewhere other than China?

    I ordered one from Wilmax and it said ‘made in China’ so I returned it. :-/

    Thanks!

    Reply
  2. 4 stars
    RE: Wilmax Thermo Glass Tea Pot For Herbal Tea
    20 oz $16.54
    29oz: $66.04
    $49.50 difference for 9 oz? REALLY?????
    WOW, ridiculous difference in cost for 20 and 29 oz.
    I’m looking at the no stovetop ones as I use a hot pot…
    So the two you had first are the ones I’m interested in. And the second one, they aren’t in stock…probably made in china…
    I’ve put them on my wish list. Still a bit scared of using glass for hot things that isn’t a mason or ball jar!!!

    Reply
    • When I wrote this article the two teapots were pretty close in price – that can fluctuate over time based on availability and the shop that is selling it. Might be worth checking back later to see if the price goes back down.

      Reply
      • OK< I'll keep checking back. Yes, the one listed from the "Scandinavian" store IS made in China! Had to search for quite awhile to find the CEO's name and it's Peng Lin. Doesn't sound Scandinavian to me! I'm so upset about how much we buy from China, I have decided, for me, I'm not going to willingly buy any more from there. (Only if I have NO OTHER choice.)
        I do kind of like the idea of a glass teapot. I already have 7 others, (my mom collected them and when she moved into FosterCare, we divided up her collection between myself, and my 2 daughters). The rest are in storage to sell.

        Reply
  3. Hello, I just wish to clarify something. These teapots which are ” stove top safe”–are you saying that you can use them to boil water? Thanks so much.
    Martha

    Reply
  4. Thanks for sharing all this useful information. You have helped me choose many items. You are a blessing. Thanks for what you do.

    Reply
  5. Love this great info you’re sharing! I will be getting the Wilmax 32oz pot. I have a number of teapots but they’re not for stove use. Will be nice to eliminate a step or two.

    Thank you,

    Sandra

    Reply